Bill to intercept Private email communication

In September last year, at a conference on British government plans to give police and intelligence services the right to read private email, Patricia Hewitt, the minister for e-commerce, claimed these plans were necessary “because crime has become global and digital and we have to combat this”. Cyber crime is a serious threat. What she omitted to mention was that one of the “crimes” the government was setting out to combat was the kind of peaceful protest actions that took place in Seattle at the WTO meeting. This has now been made crystal clear in the proposed Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.

Continuing with a definition first brought in by the Thatcher government to allow police to tap the phones of union members in the 1985 British miners’ strike, the Bill specifically designates “conduct by a

large number of persons in pursuit of a common purpose” to be “a serious crime” justifying an interception of their private email correspondence. The police requested that this measure be introduced in! a report into the demonstration that took place at the City of London as part of an international day of protest actions on June 18th last year.

Bill to intercept Private email communication

Interception Story

Follows is an ongoing and evolving story about the RIP Bill. The purpose of this story is to overload or just inconvenience the groups responsible for e-mail interception of the direct action movement.

Add your own sentence to the story trying to incorporate some words from the peaceful protest movement that could be picked up on by a spying organisation and then send to 5 friends. Feel free to edit parts in line with peaceful protest.

Story

Once upon a time GM (Gene Mulder) sent an e-mail to her friend about a peaceful party (Non-Violent Direct Action) in London. The party was

highlighting that people should be allowed to gather without being labeled as Terrorists and being peaceful, the only bombs to be used would be party poppers. ‘We’re meeting at 2 o’clock on the north side of

Hammersmith Bridge’, she wrote and added her mobile number at the bottom of the email in case of an emergency.